Don’t Overlook These 5 Tax Breaks

Freeimages/Paige Foster
Freeimages/Paige Foster

Don’t overlook these last-minute tax breaks

Part 3 of a 4-part series

Year-end tax planning may yield some pleasant surprises in the form of tax breaks you hadn’t thought of before. Take a look at these five possible tax breaks and see if they may be an option for you. 

Always check with a qualified tax pro to see if you meet the requirements for any of these tax breaks. 

1.  Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC): While this credit is only available if your income falls within the low to moderate range for your household size, don’t count it out if you’ve had some significant changes to your earnings this year. Those changes can include:

  • Job loss or layoff
  • Significant cut in pay or hours
  • Disability

If you’ve experienced any of these events this year, chances are you struggled with significantly less income than in prior years. Check with a tax pro to see if you are eligible for the EITC for this year. 

2.  Jury duty fees paid to employer: If your employer pays your full salary while you’re on jury duty, they may ask you to turn over your jury duty fees (paid to you by the court) when you return to work. 

Even though jury fees are  miniscule in comparison to your income,   the IRS still regards them as taxable income. Be sure to deduct those fees from your taxes, so you aren’t taxed on money that was passed directly to your employer. 

Be sure to save any statement or receipts verifying the jury duty payments.

3. State taxes you paid last year: If you ended up owing state income tax last year, be sure to include that amount on this year’s return as an itemized deduction. You may also include any estimated quarterly income taxes you’ve paid as well. 

4. Self-employed health insurance premiums: If you’re self-employed, you know firsthand that insurance coverage isn’t cheap. The IRS understands this and allows for self-employed workers to deduct insurance premiums for medical, dental and long-term care insurance. 

This deduction includes insurance premiums paid for yourself and your dependents. You can include this figure as an itemized deduction on Schedule A of your 1040 tax form. 

5. Protective clothing required for work: If your line of work requires you to wear protective clothing, you’re in luck. Items such as hard hats, goggles, work boots, and fire-retardant outer wear are just some of deductible items. 

There is a catch, however. The clothing items can’t double as street wear, and they must be required by your employer. You’ll deduct the cost of these items on Schedule A of your federal tax return. 

As with any deduction, always check with a tax pro to see if you’re eligible. 

These easily overlooked tax breaks can take the sting out of tax day. Gather your receipts and tax records, talk with a tax pro, and get ready to enjoy a lower tax liability for your 2015 taxes. 

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